Ebola, the 1857 National Hotel Disease and American Paranoia

Ebola, the 1857 National Hotel Disease and American Paranoia

Pierre L’Enfant’s grand Pennsylvania Avenue connecting the Capitol and the Executive Mansion. At the start of Buchanan’s administration, it was the only paved street in Washington, D.C. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Guest blog post by Kerry Walters No more than a few cases of Ebola, two of them imported, have been diagnosed to date in the United States, and the Centers for Disease Control is confident that there’s no danger of a North America epidemic.  Still, panic has shot through the American public.  Several states have imposed […]

The Forgotten Adventures of Richard Halliburton

The Forgotten Adventures of Richard Halliburton

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Q&A with author R. Scott Williams The Forgotten Adventures of Richard Halliburton: From Tennessee to Timbuktu explores West Tennessee writer and adventurer Richard Halliburton’s dramatic rise to fame, his sensational career and the events that led to his disappearance at sea in 1939. Halliburton was born in Brownsville, Tennessee in 1900 and raised in Memphis. […]

Haunted Ships of California

Haunted Ships of California

Photo via Patrick Burns.

Guest blog post by author Brian Clune When we think of Halloween, we think of haunted houses, scary mazes, witches and goblins. But how many of us think about ships? That’s right, I said ships. Here in California, we have some of the most haunted vessels afloat—transports, warships, schooners and luxury liners, all waiting for […]

History Carnival 138: September Roundup

History Carnival 138: September Roundup

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Welcome to the September 2014 edition of the History Carnival, a monthly showcase of some of the best history blogging on the web. We are excited to be the host of the 138th History Carnival. *  This project took us on exciting adventure that was both educational and exhilarating.  We were delighted to have the opportunity to review […]

Boston and the Civil War: Hub of the Second Revolution

Boston and the Civil War: Hub of the Second Revolution

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This entry, adapted from Barbara F. Berenson’s Boston and the Civil War: Hub of the Second Revolution, published in June, focuses on the critical election of 1864. September 1864, 150 years ago this month, marked a turning point in the election campaign. As the summer of 1864 approached, the North was badly divided as it […]

Call for submissions: History Carnival blog nominations

We are proud to host the 138th History Carnival, featuring the most intriguing and interesting history blog posts of September 2014. We invite you to nominate the most captivating, thrilling and thought-provoking history posts from the month of September.  The “History Carnival” roundup will be released via Historypressblog.net on October 1, 2014. Please use this form to […]

Japanese American Baseball in California

Japanese American Baseball in California

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Four generations of Japanese Americans broke down racial and cultural barriers in California by playing baseball. Behind the barbed wire of concentration camps during World War II, baseball became a tonic of spiritual renewal for disenfranchised Japanese Americans who played America’s pastime while illegally imprisoned. Later, it helped heal resettlement wounds in Los Angeles, San […]

The Murder of Maggie Hume: Cold Case in Battle Creek

The Murder of Maggie Hume: Cold Case in Battle Creek

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Q&A with best-selling true crime authors Blaine Pardoe & Victoria Hester Sometime in the late night/early morning hours of 17-18 August, 1982, Margaret “Maggie” Hume was brutally assaulted and strangled in her apartment in Battle Creek Michigan. The twenty-year-old was the daughter of a beloved Catholic high school football coach in this Midwestern town and the shear ferocity of […]

Attack on Orleans: The World War I Submarine Raid on Cape Cod

Attack on Orleans: The World War I Submarine Raid on Cape Cod

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Guest blog post by author Jake Klim July 21 marks an interesting anniversary. On this day in 1918, shells from a German U-boat struck the sandy beaches of Orleans, Massachusetts, giving the modest coastal hamlet on Cape Cod a unique attribute – it was the ONLY spot anywhere in the United States to receive enemy […]

The History Press Inc. joins Arcadia Publishing in New Partnership

The History Press Inc. joins Arcadia Publishing in New Partnership

Arcadia Publishing

CHARLESTON, SC—July 9, 2014—The History Press Ltd. (based out of the U.K.) has sold its American subsidiary, the History Press Inc., to Arcadia Publishing. Subsequently, we’re pleased to announce a new partnership with Arcadia Publishing. Arcadia CEO Richard Joseph said of the deal: “The combination of Arcadia Publishing and The History Press creates the largest and most […]